Your pregnancy journey

Birth options team and deciding where to give birth

If you have had a baby born by caesarean before, or have ongoing physical complications from a previous birth experience, we would like to give you some additional support in making choices around where and when to give birth to your baby in this pregnancy.  Our birth options team are midwives and doctors who are focussed on providing you with all of the information that you need to make the right choice for you and your family.

At your birth options clinic you will usually meet a midwife to discuss your previous birth experience.  We would advise that this appointment takes place at around 24 weeks pregnancy to inform your ongoing care in pregnancy.

You will then need to meet with an Obstetrician (doctor) to make a personalised care plan together.  We would recommend that you have made a plan by 34 weeks of pregnancy to inform your ongoing care in pregnancy.

Vaginal birth after caesarean (VBAC) or planned caesarean: what are my options?

Download the shared decision leaflet below for more information about vaginal birth after caesarean (VBAC) and a scheduled caesarean section.

Download the shared decision leaflet PI birth options after previous caesarean section PI choosing to have a c-section

To contact the birth options team, email: sash.birth.options@nhs.net

Your voice, your Choice – Deciding where to give birth to your baby

At SASH Maternity, we want to provide you with all the information relating to your care, so you can make the right decision for you and your baby.

The National Institute of Clinical Excellence states: “Healthy women who are at low risk of complications should have an opportunity to choose where to give birth”. We want to support you to make the right decision for you and your baby.

The birthplace study found that women having straightforward, healthy pregnancies with no medical complications planning birth at home or in The Birth Centre had significantly fewer interventions, for example; epidural, ventouse, forceps, caesarean, than similar women starting their labour in an obstetric unit (Delivery Suite).

Some circumstances mean that place of birth should be considered on an individual basis. These include if you have a medical condition which is stable, previous severe tears or bleeding during birth (third or fourth degree tears), being aged over 40 at booking, first time mum having a higher BMI (30–35 kg/m2), expecting a fifth or subsequent baby.

Wondering what to do if you are at increased risk of complications, or you need individual assessment, and have not been given a choice of place of birth?

Talk to a senior midwife about your birth preferences and place of birth to fully inform you of your options using the most up to date research available.

Please email susan.meadows1@nhs.net and Jo.willis2@nhs.net for further information.